“Let’s all calm down about Leonardo DiCaprio”

February 1, 2016 15:48:16 Posted at February 1, 2016 15:48:16
Lainey Posted by Lainey
Dimitrios Kambouris/ Christopher Polk/ Frazer Harrison/ Dan MacMedan/ Steve Granitz/ Getty Images

Two years ago, while hosting the Golden Globes, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler introduced Leonardo DiCaprio like this:

Jokes? Of course, of course, OF COURSE.

But these are also the two women who hosted Saturday Night Live in December and delivered what’s been the best sketch of the season: Meet Your Second Wife. Remember it? Click here if you haven’t seen it. It’s widely believed that Tina and Amy wrote that sketch themselves. So… they probably have some thoughts on men like Leo who – and a little bit George Clooney- “would rather float off to space and die than spend one more minute with a woman his own age”.

One time is creative coincidence. But what about two times? In a room full of actors, on Saturday night, during their introduction of Carol Burnett, while making a point about comedy vs drama, Tina and Amy chose to single out Leo again:

And Leo’s reaction:

He’s laughing but he doesn’t look relaxed to me. He’s laughing but he looks nervous. I mean, in the end they’ve done him no harm. He’ll still win the Oscar. But they did mock The Struggle. Everyone’s been mocking The Struggle but the Tina and Amy mock was on a big stage, with a loud voice. It calls attention to the ridiculous amount of hyperbole about his performance. They’re telling a serious actor who takes himself very seriously that he needs to get over himself because they KNOW who he is. Even when he got up on stage and tried to pay his respects to the giants of the “craft” before him (how many times did he say craft?!?) and urged a new generation of actors to learn the history of cinema… oh, yes, exactly. Because the history of cinema, right now, is certainly being highlighted for its breadth of storytelling and inclusion of narrative, is it? Is that’s why he keeps making movies from bygone eras? And with Tina and Amy up on stage, applauding Carol Burnett for advancing representation in arts and entertainment, isn’t it so great how much Leo does for women, diversity, and equality in film?

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