Dear Gossips, 

Big music news today – new music from Andre 3000. It’s been over 17 years. He is universally recognised as one of the great rappers of all time. So it’s an understatement to say that the anticipation has been, well, it’s been so high it’s basically disappeared. Because Andre, in addition to not releasing music for such a long time also keeps a very, very, VERY low profile. He’ll pop up in a feature now and again, and that will lead to a new round of speculation and excitement about what and when he might drop something of his own, but then he’ll go back undercover and show up randomly in on someone’s IG or TikTok playing his flute somewhere. 

 

Now, though, he’s finally ready to share the music he’s been working on – and it’s not what anyone would have expected. New Blue Sun comes out this Friday with eight tracks, all of them by Andre but none of them with his voice. Per NPR, to whom he gave an exclusive interview announcing the album: 

“No bars, no beats, no sub-bass. André doesn't sing on this joint, either. What he does do is play flute, and plenty of it — contrabass flute, Mayan flutes, bamboo flutes — along with other digital wind instruments.”  

 

It’s a radical choice as an artist, especially an artist of his stature, to go in another totally wild direction, because that’s where he was compelled to put his creative energy. And he knows, of course, that this is not what people were waiting for, not necessarily what they wanted. As we always say though, real artistic courage is giving people not what they want but what they need. Or at least what the artist themselves needs in the moment. 

To make up for the lack of lyrics on the album, Andre instead gave us extra, EXTRA long song titles. The titles in the tweet below are not quotes, they’re the names of the songs!

 

This is the song I’ll be playing first: 

“The Slang Word P(*)ssy Rolls Off The Tongue With Far Better Ease Than The Proper Word Va*ina . Do You Agree?”

Click here for Andre 3000’s full interview with NPR. It’s worth the read, especially when he describes his writing process, about how he’s a slow creative, not someone who can bang out a killer verse in a flash but a person who needs time to build his train of words. 

He’s thoughtful, some might say he’s esoteric, but he doesn’t seem inaccessible. And most importantly he sounds like he’s emerging from something and ready, perhaps, to perform. That can only be a good thing for the state of music. 

Yours in gossip,

Lainey